What did you do the last time you cracked your phone’s screen? Chances are you ran to the phone store and got yourself a replacement, at least once the crack started affecting your phone’s performance. Most people will replace rather than repair smartphones, and it’s adding 350,000 phones to the waste stream in America each day.

We rely on our phones for just about everything. In fact, 20% of us rely on a smartphone as our only connection to the internet. We use our phones to search for and apply for jobs, to communicate with our workplaces, and to stay connected with friends and family.

Since 1973 cell phones have been the fastest growing piece of consumer technology in human history, and in just the last 16 years cell phone ownership has grown by 33%. Smartphones are growing more rapidly than general cell phones, doubling in less than a decade.

Our phones have become part of our daily lives. We don’t need them to survive per se, but we do need them to keep a job, which is certainly tantamount to survival.

When our phones aren’t working right it can cause anxiety, and for good reason. An astounding 40% of people say that they use their smartphones for everyday work purposes, while 52% say they couldn’t do their job without a phone.

Because we can’t be without phones for long, it may seem reasonable to replace a phone as soon as it is broken, just in case.

The most common types of cell phone problems are cracked and scratched screens, at a frequency of 29% and 27%, respectively. The next most common cell phone damage comes from a bad batter, which happens 22% of the time.

Last year 2 million phone screens were broken every single second in America. These phones fell off tables or from pockets.

These broken phones prevented people from reading emails, using apps, taking photos, and even unlocking screens. In short, it’s a major hassle.

The good news is that these are all easily fixable problems. Many people would like to avoid sending off their phones for repair, but these fixes can often be made at a repair shop while you wait.

Most people — 80% — wait a week or more to repair a broken cell phone, often because they believe it will be a hassle or they might have to leave it behind. You can often replace batteries yourself pretty easily, but screens are a bit trickier.

Many people attempt to repair phones following videos on YouTube, but it’s often easier to take the phone to someone who does this every day and knows what they are doing.

To prevent these problems from happening in the first place, it makes sense to invest in a case and a screen protector. Still, many people don’t use them for whatever reason, from not liking the way they look to just not wanting to spend the money. But they can save your investment from costly breakage.

We often want to replace instead of repair our phones because it’s easier, but we should just go ahead and fix our broken phones already.