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Saluting Our Nation’s Veterans in the Security Sector

As we approach Veteran’s day, we collectively honor America’s veterans for their patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacrifice for our country.  While it is great to shine the spotlight on our nation’s veterans on this special day, we should all be thanking them for their service each and every day.

The physical security sector is fortunate to attract thousands of veterans into our ranks.  The security services sector is rapidly growing, with “global security service revenues forecast to rise 3.6% per year to $263 billion in 2024 which provides significant opportunities for veterans to rise through the ranks.

While many businesses talk the talk about why military veterans are important hires, the physical security sector actually walks the walk.  The physical security sector honors and appreciates the sacrifices made by our nation’s military, and they seek out ways to show that appreciation each and every day.  The following veterans are a small representative sample of the outstanding men and women who now work in the physical security sector:

Jonathan LopezJonathan, a decorated Marine, served over 10 years in the United States Marine Corps. He wanted to be a Marine since the age of 14 when he saw his Uncle Henry, fresh from boot camp in his “Dress Blues” uniform. Jonathan is now a security professional working in the physical security sector and says that his team shows the same camaraderie that he felt in the Corps. The Corps taught him never to give, to keep pushing through and he’s been doing that ever since. Jonathan is currently an operations manager within the security industry.

Jonathan Lopez

Tammy Nixon – For more than 12 years, Tammy Nixon served her country as a Seabee in the United States Navy. She followed in her grandfather and father’s footsteps as her father served in the Navy and her grandfather served during World War I. During her military career, Tammy was stationed in Orlando, Florida, Gulfport, Mississippi, Atsugi, Japan, San Diego, California, Barbers Point, Hawaii and Whidbey Island, Washington. As a Navy Seabee or US Naval Construction Battalion, Tammy supported humanitarian efforts and helped to build communities and nations around the globe. Today, Tammy is a Regional Vice President working in the security industry.

Tammy Nixon

Peter Yeschenko – Peter’s father served more than 26 years in the Navy, and his wife is retired from the Navy with more than 22 years of service. In addition, all five of his uncles served in the military. With a longing to travel the world and serve his country, Peter joined the U.S. Navy at a young age serving more than 31 years. After being stationed in 18 different commands including Italy, Spain, Philippines, Japan, Kingdom of Bahrain and Hawaii, he retired as a Force Master Chief. When Peter was promoted to Master Chief, he didn’t realize that only the top 1% of enlisted personnel in the Navy have received this promotion so he was truly honored. In addition, he was awarded the prestigious Meritorious Service Medal (MSM) five times – another honor as only a small number of servicemen receive this award. Peter says that his experience in the military has influenced his physical security career. Six years ago, he joined the industry as a Security Professional and was promoted several times before accepting the Director of Security position for a retail mall. During the recent civil unrest, Peter worked with local law enforcement to help safeguard his client’s retail property. Due to the fact that his property was secured with no issues, he received personal commendation from the Assistant Zone Commander.

Peter Yeschenko

It’s time that all business leaders look at their roster of employees and highlight the brave military veterans that we are fortunate to employ.  Salute their service and patriotism and support their ability to advance through the corporate ranks.  As James Allen, the late British author, said, “No duty is more urgent than that of returning thanks.”