Laws Regarding Employee Conduct: What You Need to Know

By Cory Maki Cory Maki has been verified by Muck Rack's editorial team
Published on August 10, 2022

In recent years, there have been several changes to the laws regulating employee conduct. As an employer, you must be aware of these changes and ensure that your employees comply. This article will discuss some of the most important laws regarding employee conduct. 

Via Pexels

1) The Labor Law Posters Rule: 

This rule, implemented in April 2017, requires employers to display certain Labor Law Posters in the workplace. The posters must be prominently displayed and accessible to all employees. In addition, the posters must include information on the rights of employees under federal law and contact information for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Employers who fail to comply with this rule may be subject to civil penalties of up to $1600 per violation. 

2) The Fair Labor Standards Act: 

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) is a federal law that establishes minimum wage and overtime pay standards. The FLSA applies to most private sector employers and all public sector employers. 

Under the FLSA, employees must be paid at least the federal minimum wage for all hours worked. In addition, employees who work more than 40 hours a week must be paid time-and-a-half for all overtime hours. 

There are some exceptions to these general rules. For example, certain workers may be exempt from the overtime pay requirements. These exemptions include executive, administrative, and professional employees and certain highly compensated workers. 

3) The National Labor Relations Act: 

The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) is a federal law that protects the rights of employees to form unions and engage in collective bargaining. The NLRA applies to most private sector employers. 

Under the NLRA, employees have the right to form unions and bargain collectively with their employers. Employees also have the right to engage in “concerted activity” for their or other employees’ benefit. This includes activities such as strikes, picketing, and work stoppages. 

There are some exceptions to these general rules. For example, certain types of workers may not be covered by the NLRA. These exemptions include independent contractors, agricultural workers, and domestic workers. 

Via Pexels

4) The Occupational Safety and Health Act: 

The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) is a federal law that requires employers to provide a safe and healthful workplace for their employees. OSHA applies to most private sector employers and all public sector employers. 

Under OSHA, employers must take steps to prevent or eliminate hazards in the workplace. This includes providing safety training, using proper safety equipment, and maintaining safe work conditions. Employers who fail to comply with OSHA standards may be subject to civil penalties. 

5) The Family and Medical Leave Act: 

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is a federal law that provides certain employees with the right to take unpaid leave for certain family and medical reasons. The FMLA applies to most private sector employers and all public sector employers. 

Under the FMLA, eligible employees are entitled to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave per year for specific family and medical reasons. These reasons include the birth or adoption of a child, the serious illness of a spouse, parent, or child, or the employee’s own serious health condition. 

Employers who violate the FMLA may be subject to civil penalties of up to $11,000 per violation. 

In conclusion, employers need to be aware of the various laws that apply to employee conduct. These laws can be complex, and they change regularly. Therefore, it is advisable to consult with an experienced employment attorney if you have any questions or concerns about these laws. This article is not intended to be legal advice. You should always consult with an attorney for specific legal advice. 

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By Cory Maki Cory Maki has been verified by Muck Rack's editorial team

Cory Maki is a Staff Editor and the Business Development Manager at Grit Daily. Email [email protected](dot)com for PR pitches, advertising, and sponsored post inquiries.

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