Press "Enter" to skip to content

Guy Ritchie is Writing and Directing ‘The Gentlemen’ TV Show

The Gentlemen is one of this year’s surprising hits at the box-office. Due to COVID-19 we haven’t seen a theatrical hit in many months now, but Guy Ritchie‘s gangster comedy was a hit with audiences across the globe. It connected in America, the United States, and other territories. Following the commercial and critical success of the film, Ritchie is writing and directing a TV show based on his own movie. Get ready for The Gentlemen TV show.

The irony is that Ritchie initially imagined The Gentlemen as a television show before he changed the idea in the movie. Given the colorful ensemble of characters and the rich world, it’s easy to imagine how The Gentlemen would’ve worked as a TV show. Ritchie is collaborating with Miramax TV on the project.

Miramax was a major player in the industry in the 1990s. They produced best picture winners, made movie stars, and released some of the best movies of the decade. Unfortunately, Harvey Weinstein’s name is synonymous with Miramax. Over the last few years, Miramax hasn’t done much to write home about. They fell on hard times, financially. The kind of movies Miramax made aren’t the movies Hollywood makes today. They produced dramas, comedies, and nothing remotely related to superheroes, franchises, or major properties.

Miramax is now looking to use their catalog of films to produce TV shows. For example, the company is making a show based on Guillermo del Toro’s Mimic, which was a movie butchered by Harvey Weinstein that del Toro later tried to salvage as a director’s cut. A Mimic TV show doesn’t sound like a bad idea, and neither does a television show based on The Gentlemen.

Miramax’s Head of Worldwide Television, Marc Helwig, is behind the project and the company’s mission to produce hit TV shows based on movies. “Working with one of the most distinctive and prolific filmmakers working today and someone whose creativity I have admired for many years, we couldn’t be more excited to bring the cinematic journey of The Gentlemen forth into the realm of global premium television,” Helwig said.

Ritchie is now busy filming another thriller for STX Entertainment, which distributed his previous film. The hit gangster movie isn’t without its critics, though. Ritchie’s film was accused of casual racism, which actor Henry Golding addressed. “If you think gangsters aren’t going to be racist and go down to the lowest derogatory terminologies, I don’t know what kind of world you live in,” he said.

The critics were in the minority, though. Audiences enjoyed the film. In addition to making over $115 million worldwide, the gangster pic probably did big business on VOD earlier this year. Major titles have been cleaning house on VOD. Mulan made over $300 million, Trolls World Tour surpassed $100 million, and Bill & Ted Face the Music tripled its box-office numbers on VOD. Most likely, The Gentlemen raked in even more bank on VOD. It’s not a great movie and suffers from a serious lack of momentum and drive, but it charms with its winning cast, song choices, and world-building. It was Ritchie doing what he does well.