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Ghislaine Maxwell Pleads Not Guilty To Federal Sex Crimes

On Tuesday morning, Ghislaine Maxwell entered a not guilty plea in response to several charges related to her relationship with Jeffery Epstein. The arraignment took place over videoconference.

The FBI arrested Maxwell in New Hampshire July 2. She was subsequently charged with enticement and conspiracy to entice minors to travel to engage in illegal sex acts, transportation, and conspiracy to transport minors with intent to engage in criminal sexual activity. Federal prosecutors also charged Maxwell with two counts of perjury in connection with a 2016 deposition.

Maxwell is accused of recruiting and grooming girls, some as young as 14, for herself and Epstein to abuse. Epstein was arrested almost a year before Maxwell and ultimately committed suicide in prison.

At the hearing, prosecutors argued that Maxwell is an extreme flight risk and should be held without bail. When the FBI located Maxwell in New Hampshire, she resided in a home she purchased through an LLC while posing as a journalist under the name Jen Marshall. This, in conjunction with her enormous wealth, is why she should be held in a facility instead of home confinement, according to prosecutors. Maxwell’s defense attorneys, however, argued that she should be released on a $5 million bond and confined to a Manhattan residence. Ultimately, the judge decided to deny Maxwell’s request for bail. She will remain in custody.

The not guilty plea means the case will go to trial. The trial will likely last around three weeks and will begin July 12th, 2021. The trial will undoubtedly be a media sensation. The story has already captured significant media attention. It is the subject of several documentary series including Jeffrey Epstein: Filthy Rich. The media frenzy is no surprise given the couple was associated with some of the most wealthy and powerful people in the world, including Donald Trump, Bill Clinton, and Prince Andrew.