Growing up in the suburbs of Chicago, Attorney Maria Z. Vathis always knew that she wanted to help others while pursuing her interests in writing and public speaking. To accomplish her goals, she decided to go to law school, having made up her mind early in her collegiate career. But, what she didn’t expect was that she would one day be leading the Federal Bar Association in their journey of becoming a more attorney-friendly institution.

Welcoming The New President

Come September 15, 2018, Maria Z. Vathis of Chicago’s Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP will be installed as President of the Federal Bar Association (“FBA”) during their annual meeting and convention in New York City.

What was most exciting about this was having the opportunity as a young, millennial attorney to speak with the soon to be FBA President. Vathis has been a member of the FBA since the beginning of her legal career, having served as the Chicago Chapter President in 2011, and an officer on the FBA’s Board of Directors.

Maria has a diverse practice which concentrates on commercial litigation and class action defense. She handles litigation nationwide in both federal and state courts and represents fashion and retail clients from the United States and Europe. Maria has appeared on The Opening Bell on WGN Radio and Sirott and Murciano on WLSAM. She has also been featured in Buzzfeed, GenHERation, and NCR Silver.

While Vathis and I differ in years of legal experience, we do have one thing in common—our passion for writing. Having only been licensed to practice law for two and a half years, it was with great honor and privilege that I was able to speak with the FBA President-elect, as well as pick her brain on tips for my generation of legal practitioners.

Challenges Facing New Attorneys In The Legal Field

 

Photo credit: Pixabay

#1 –What You’ve Learned In Law School Is Not The Same As Real World Practice of Law

AR: What is the biggest challenge you see new attorneys facing as they join the legal profession?

MV: It’s the same as it has been for years—making the transition from being in school to now actually practicing law. A lot of times what you’ve learned in law school is not exactly what you need to know on the job.

You’re still in that learning period when you first start your job. That can be a bit of a surprise for some people, because you don’t know what path you’re going to take. As you know, law school teaches you how to think, but you actually learn your job once you start practicing.

#2 –Technology Makes Communication Simpler, But Practice Harder

AR: Does technology make practicing law easier and more difficult at the same time?

MV: I would agree with that. I think there are more resources out there to provide some guidance or if you want to find an organization that fits your interest, I feel it’s easier to do that now with social media. But, the problem is that we all spend more time on social media than we should. I think it’s a balance, and sometimes that’s hard to find.

Vathis and I recently appeared on Legal Talk Network’s Lawyer 2 Lawyer program, where we discussed how to address the very serious issue of cyberbullying.

#3 –Health and Wellness

MV: In general, I think it’s important to know that it is really a great profession to be a part of, and we do have the ability to help people, and give back to the community.

I think it’s important to know, that yes, you will work hard in this profession, but the thing is, you also need to focus on your own self-care. No one is going to do that for you, so it’s important to keep that in mind as you are working hard and as you’re building your career.

#4 –The “Seven Year” Partner Track

If you’ve ever been told by a family member or friend that “you didn’t go to law school for three years to do ‘XYZ’”, put that out of your minds. While it’s important to recognize that the people who are saying this are looking out for you, do not be weighed down by the traditional and narrow-minded approach of what a “lawyer” should be doing in the 21st century. The world of technology and social media has changed the way in which people conduct business and utilize their skills.

In talking about how Vathis and I both utilized law school to travel down our own paths, we both agreed that our stories have proven one fact about the profession—there isn’t just one path, you can do so many different things with your degree and license.

For example, not only do I practice criminal defense and internet law, but I also have utilized my degree to weigh in and cover legal issues facing millennials as it pertains to the practice of law as well as utilizing entrepreneurial skills when investing in digital monies and technologies.

AR: Have you come across similar views in your time as an attorney?

MV: Yes, I have definitely come across these views, and it’s important to recognize that the people who are giving you their two cents, it is coming from a good place. The world is changing, and you have to figure that the people who are giving you the advice on whether or not something is the best idea, are just looking out for you.

But, sometimes taking the path that isn’t well traveled, leads you to the success you want, and the contentment as well. I think it’s worth the risk, because you can always practice, and you can always open up your own firm. It’s not like you’ve closed off other options, but simply trying something new.

MV: I believe your example is very important for people to be aware of. There isn’t just one path when you have a law degree. You can do so many different things with it, and I hope that the younger generation is aware of that, because I think things are changing, because the world is becoming smaller with social media. I think it’s important for people to know that if you have a passion or a goal, you should go for it, and not be limited to the traditional way of the seven-year partner track and that’s it. There’s just so many things you can do.

Utilize Your Local State Bar Association

MV: I think you are going to find different types of mentors throughout your path in this career. But, it’s really important as a law student to know that people want to help you. It’s a great time to reach out to people already practicing and any questions you have, you should feel comfortable reaching out to attorneys, especially if you’re part of the bar association, because you have something in common, and it’s easier to reach out. I think being part of a group like that gives you an additional resource that will help you succeed.

You can follow what the Federal Bar Association is doing on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram.

Drew Rossow is a contributing editor to Grit Daily. He is a criminal defense/internet attorney, writer, and adjunct law professor in Dayton, Ohio. Born and raised in Dallas, Texas. A Millennial, Rossow provides perspectives on social media crimes, privacy risks, Millennials, and business. Rossow consults for ABC, FOX, and NBC on the latest news in technology law.