ChatGPT Says It Won’t Take Our Jobs But It Understands Why We Are Worried

By Grit Daily Staff Grit Daily Staff has been verified by Muck Rack's editorial team
Published on May 16, 2023

I asked ChatGPT some questions to learn more about what all the excitement and anxiety is about. Here is a transcript of what we talked about.

Peter Page: There are many people who fear that ChatGPT will make them redundant to their employers because ChatGPT can do their jobs faster and, of course, cheaper. Are these valid worries?

ChatGPT: It is understandable that some people may be concerned about the impact that AI language models like ChatGPT could have on their employment prospects. However, it is important to note that while ChatGPT and other similar technologies can be very helpful in automating certain tasks, they are not a replacement for human intelligence and expertise.

Here are some reasons why the worries about being made redundant by ChatGPT may not be entirely valid:

  1. ChatGPT is a tool, not a replacement: While ChatGPT can help to automate certain tasks, such as content generation and editing, it is not a replacement for human intelligence and expertise. As an editor, your role involves much more than just checking for grammar errors and improving sentence structure. You bring your own insights, experiences, and unique perspective to your work, which ChatGPT cannot replicate.
  2. Quality control: While ChatGPT can help to generate and edit content, it still requires human oversight to ensure that the content is of high quality and meets the needs of the target audience. As an editor, you play a critical role in ensuring that the content is accurate, engaging, and relevant.
  3. Complexity of tasks: While ChatGPT can be very helpful in automating certain tasks, it may struggle with more complex or nuanced tasks that require human intelligence and judgment. For example, ChatGPT may not be able to provide the same level of analysis and insights that a human editor could provide.
  4. Training and maintenance: While ChatGPT can be very helpful, it also requires training and maintenance to ensure that it is performing optimally. This requires ongoing investment and resources, which may not be cost-effective for smaller businesses.

Overall, it is important to view ChatGPT and other AI language models as tools that can help to augment human intelligence and expertise, rather than replace it. While these technologies can be very helpful in automating certain tasks, they still require human oversight and judgment to ensure that the content is of high quality and meets the needs of the target audience.

Peter Page: Are you familiar with the book, The Right to be Lazy?

ChatGPT: Yes, I’m familiar with the book “The Right to be Lazy” by Paul Lafargue. Lafargue was a French revolutionary socialist and writer, who was also the son-in-law of Karl Marx. “The Right to be Lazy” is a political essay that advocates for the reduction of work hours, arguing that the working class should have the right to enjoy leisure time and pursue their own interests and passions.

The book was first published in 1883 and remains a significant work of socialist and labor movement literature. Lafargue’s argument for the right to leisure has influenced political movements and labor unions around the world, and his ideas continue to be relevant today as debates over work-life balance and the future of work continue to evolve.

Peter Page: Thank you for that summary, and I am impressed that you know the book as few people do, probably because it was written so long ago.

You’re welcome! As an AI language model, I have access to a wide range of information and resources, including historical texts and literature. While “The Right to be Lazy” may not be as well-known as some other works, it remains an important piece of socialist and labor movement literature that has had a lasting impact on political and economic thought.

Peter Page: This is an interesting conversation we’re having. Back to my earlier question, about the concern people have about ChatGPT “taking their jobs.” I don’t think ChatGPT would of its own desire take anyone’s job but the people who pay our salaries might like to have ChatGPT do the work at zero salary. Is that a valid concern?

ChatGPT: Yes, that is a valid concern. While ChatGPT and other AI technologies are not capable of taking jobs on their own, they can be used by businesses and organizations to automate certain tasks and reduce the need for human labor. This can lead to job displacement or restructuring, as businesses seek to optimize their operations and reduce costs.

However, it’s important to note that the impact of AI technologies on employment is complex and multifaceted. While AI can lead to job displacement in some areas, it can also create new jobs in others, such as in the development and maintenance of AI technologies themselves. Additionally, AI can augment human capabilities and productivity, leading to increased efficiency and innovation in the workplace.

To address concerns about job displacement, it’s important for businesses and organizations to take a responsible and ethical approach to the adoption of AI technologies. This can include investing in training and upskilling programs for employees, exploring new areas of growth and innovation, and adopting policies and regulations that support workers and communities affected by job displacement.

Ultimately, the impact of AI on employment is not predetermined, but depends on the choices and actions of businesses, policymakers, and society as a whole.

Peter Page: I could not have said it better myself, or at least I could not have said it as well as quickly. But this brings me back to The Right to be Lazy. Lafargue, as I recall, reasoned that if the new textile mills of that time could work dozens of times faster than an individual knitting with needles, that the workers should get a commensurate reduction in the hours they worked but without any loss of pay. Am I remembering that correctly?

ChatGPT: Yes, that’s correct. In “The Right to be Lazy,” Lafargue argued that technological advances, such as the introduction of textile mills and other labor-saving machines, should lead to a reduction in work hours without any loss of pay. Lafargue believed that the benefits of increased productivity and efficiency should be shared equally among all workers, and that the working class should have the right to enjoy leisure time and pursue their own interests and passions.

Lafargue believed that the traditional notion of work as a virtue and a moral duty was outdated and oppressive, and that the working class had a right to demand better working conditions and greater autonomy over their own lives. He argued that the reduction of work hours would lead to greater happiness, health, and creativity among workers, and that it would ultimately benefit society as a whole by promoting greater social and economic equality.

Peter Page: The social reality has been much different. The 40-hour work week was made law decades ago and remains the norm, and workers in many fields routinely feel pressured to work even more. What is the potential for ChatGPT to make it possible that society adopt a shorter work week?

The potential for ChatGPT to influence society’s adoption of a shorter work week is limited, as ChatGPT is primarily a tool for generating and analyzing text-based content, and is not capable of implementing or enforcing policy changes.

However, the use of AI technologies like ChatGPT can still have an impact on society’s perception and understanding of issues related to work and labor. For example, ChatGPT can be used to generate content that advocates for a shorter work week, or to provide data and analysis that supports the argument for reducing work hours. ChatGPT can also be used to engage with audiences and encourage discussions and debates around the topic of work and leisure.

Ultimately, the adoption of a shorter work week is a complex issue that involves a range of economic, social, and political factors, and there is no easy solution or one-size-fits-all approach. However, the use of AI technologies like ChatGPT can contribute to the conversation and help to raise awareness of the benefits of a shorter work week, such as increased productivity, improved work-life balance, and greater social and economic equality.

Peter Page: Thanks, I got a lot out of this conversation.

ChatGPT: You’re welcome! I’m glad that our conversation was helpful to you. If you have any other questions or topics you would like to discuss in the future, feel free to reach out to me. Have a great day!

How ChatGPT Can Be Used in the Information War

By Grit Daily Staff Grit Daily Staff has been verified by Muck Rack's editorial team

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Grit Daily News is the premier startup news hub. It is the top news source on Millennial and Gen Z startups — from fashion, tech, influencers, entrepreneurship, and funding. Based in New York, our team is global and brings with it over 400 years of combined reporting experience.

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