All trolls aside, the female-led superhero movie is pretty much printing money for the Walt Disney company.

When Captain Marvel was released last weekend its initial reviews from both critics and the general public were mixed. Despite that, though, the film has managed to rake in over $500 million since hitting theaters last Thursday night. That number took the entire Marvel Cinematic Universe past a worth of $18 billion. This is a big feat for the MCU’s first female-led film. Now, just imagine what those numbers could be if she had only smiled more.

Captain Marvel

The film stars Brie Larson as Captain Marvel, one of the most powerful heroes in the Marvel Cinematic Universe that—until now—hasn’t been seen on film. Trolls and mostly male reviewers have criticized the film for Larson’s role, saying that the actress delivered an overall bland performance to such an important character. The movie is set in the 1990’s, and starts off with Kree soldier Carol Danvers (Larson) crash landing in a Los Angeles Blockbuster on a search for an enemy alien race that threatens life on her home planet. In hear search, Carol meets Agent Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) who helps her find the enemy Skrull to save her planet.

The film is an origin story for the rest of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and gives a lot of background to otherwise unanswered questions left from the previous films in the series. For one, viewers finally get to learn about things like what happened to Agent Fury’s eye, or why they’re called The Avengers in the first place. For this reason the film serves a major purpose, and its place in the Marvel Cinematic Universe as a major film can’t be overlooked in the wake of films like Avengers Infinity War: End Game. Nevertheless, trolls—and uh, sexist comic book fans, for lack of a better term—have been hellbent on driving the Captain Marvel numbers down since before the film was released.

Not Your Average Female Super Hero

What separates Captain Marvel from other female super heroes—because lets be real, this is nothing new—is how her character lacks any classic female super hero tropes that make these characters so gag worthy in the first place. Brie Larson’s Captain Marvel isn’t a goddess, and the film works hard to make sure that viewers know that. Camera angles and costumes don’t portray the character as something to be catered to the male gaze, and her character doesn’t have a love interest in the film. In contrast, DC’s Wonder Woman did all of these things—and surprise, it received mostly great reviews.

Trolls have hit Captain Marvel hard in the online sphere. So hard, in fact, that Rotten Tomatoes had to change its policy of being able to review a film before its release. This is nothing new, though, as these trolls have been around for years now in some facet.. In other words, Captain Marvel was hit by a wave of angry men with fragile egos.

As unsurprising as all of this is, Captain Marvel continues to break records in its opening week. The next film to hit theaters within the Marvel Cinematic Universe will be The Avengers: End Game later this spring. Marvel has confirmed that it plans to release more female-led films in the future. The Walt Disney company has hinted at films for characters like Ms. Marvel (the franchise’s first Muslim superhero), a Black Widow movie, and a Sang Chi movie, which would be the franchise’s first Asian superhero to lead a film. Hopefully the lonely trolls can move past the idea that superhero movies are not just for men. If for nothing else, Captain Marvel proves that Disney is clearly trying to diversify its library of Marvel films.