Facehuggers and chestbursters. If those two words don’t send chills up and down your spine, then you need to stop here and spend your upcoming weekend binging the Alien franchise by Ridley Scott.

Earlier this week, Hulu announced that Ridley Scott’s Alien will be turned into an anthology TV series, with each season taking place in a different part of the Alien universe.

But is the anthology idea much of a surprise? The idea has been considered for a while now but was also hinted at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. Prior to Disney’s acquisition of 20th Century Fox, rumors of an Alien TV series have been traveling across the cosmos—with most of them being empty words.

This year marked the 40th anniversary of the theatrical release of Alien, and it’s only fair to assume that the life-cycle of the Alien still scares the absolute bejesus out of viewers.

Sundance Film Festival’s ‘Memory’ Premiere

This year, Sundance introduced the world for the first time to Memory, the script that its author, Dan O’Bannon started in 1971, which eventually took the form of the film we know today as Alien.

Source: Alexandre Philippe

Memory reveals the chilling, untold origins of Scott’s cinematic masterpiece Alien, rooted in Greek and Egyptian mythology, underground comics, the art of Francis Bacon, and the dark visions of Dan O’Bannon and H.R. Giger.

Initially, Memory had the title of Chestburster, but according to a previous interview I had with the film’s director, Alexandre Philippe, he didn’t believe it would stick.

“It went through a number of different titled, and at one point, we called it Nemesis; ultimately, we settled on Memory,” he added.

The Origin of the Chestburster

Source: Alexandre Philippe

In O’Bannon’s first version of the film’s screenplay back in 1971, the film we now know as Alien, was only 29 pages.

“It was pretty much the first act of Alien as we know it, but he got stuck and couldn’t move forward,” he pointed out.

He hadn’t yet found a way to get the alien on board the ship, so with the help of Ron Shusett, Memory eventually became Starbeast, and Starbeast ultimately became Alien.”

Back to today’s potential adaptations and televised version of Scott’s Alien, recent reports hint at Hulu currently working on an Alien series. If it turns out that this rumor is true, it’s probably fair to assume that Prometheus and Alien: Covenant will be pushed to the side for now—SPOILER ALERT AHEAD:

If you haven’t seen Alien: Covenant, this is your chance to turn away.

The way in which the film ended could have left a potential sequel, but at the same time, it was a hauntingly beautiful ending that really doesn’t need much of a follow-up.

The only thing I actually care about if this universe gets translated into a regular streaming series, is that if Alien isn’t translated into an R-rated show in some form, I will be sorely disappointed and will forever remove the memory that Hulu has attempted to expand the genius work that is Ridley Scott.