As Shark Week has officially kicked off this week, we have some cool facts that will probably, so come on board and suit up! Scientists generally believe that sharks were swimming in oceans long before dinosaurs were walking on land—dating back at least 420 years.

As you may know, Shark Week is the longest-running cable television program in history. If there’s anything to take away from this, it’s that there are so many undiscovered species of sharks out there that are waiting to be tagged and discovered.

#1 –Sharks Grow Teeth Like No Tomorrow

Did you know that sharks are constantly growing new teeth to replace old ones? Well, little did you know, how sensitive its teeth are, considering how much it bites into things. The reason for the sensitivity is that like humans, shark teeth also have roots—making them easy to fall out.

Sharks can have hundreds of teeth, but only some are in the front, ready to be used at any time to start chomping.

Some sharks have more than 300 teeth in different stages of development, while others may have more than 50,000 teeth during their lives—that’s a lot of flossing!

Unlike human teeth, sharks have multiple rows of teeth. However, it takes a couple of weeks for teeth from the back rows to move forward.

#2 –This Shark Can Glow In the Dark

Take the recently-discovered American Pocket Shark for example, a tiny species of shark that glows in the dark and lives in the Gulf of Mexico.

According to a study released by Tulane University, scientists recently discovered this species, stating they have only caught two examples of Pocket Sharks—the first back in 1970, off the coast of Chile, naming it the Mollisquama Parini.

The second pocket shark was the first “American” Pocked Shark, discovered off the Gulf Coast back in 2013.

#3—Most Shark Attacks Are ‘Unprovoked’

Part of Shark Week is educating people that most of these shark attacks we hear about are unprovoked. The International Shark Attack File evaluated 130 cases of alleged shark attacks involving humans in 2018. Of those 130 cases, sixty-six (66) of them were confirmed to be “unprovoked,” while thirty-four (34) were confirmed to be provoked.

A “provoked attack” occurs when a human initiates interaction with a shark in some way. For example, when a diver is bitten after harassing or trying to touch a shark, attacks on spear fishers, people attempting to feed sharks, and even bites occurring while unhooking or removing a shark from a fishing net.

#4—Humans Are Friends, Not Food

As Bruce the Shark said in Finding Nemo, “fish are friends, not food”—well, so are humans. While we as humans have every reason to fear sharks, they also have every reason to fear us. We are in their home and their world.

Contrary to many people’s beliefs, sharks are necessary and good for the environment. They play a very important role in balancing the oceanic food chain—ensuring that the ocean population remains healthy and free of disease-containing animals.

#5 –You Can Adopt Sharks…Kind Of

Just in time for this week’s event, Margaritaville’s favorite island-style brew, LandShark Lager is teaming up with global conservation activists at Shark Angels.

Through this partnership, LandShark is aiming to aid in their efforts to educate and provide awareness to the biggest issues facing sharks and their ecosystems today. LandShark is proud to donate to their cause and in-turn adopt 100 sharks.

“We created an opportunity to bring fans of our island-style lager to our spiritual home in Margaritaville and experience the island life for themselves with the Shark Dive sweepstakes,” said Derek Mauk, Senior Brand Director at Anheuser-Busch.

“Beyond this experience, we wanted to demonstrate our commitment to shark conservation through our new partnership with Shark Angels.”

In a brief statement to Grit Daily, Shark Angels Executive Director, Jamie Pollack, informed us that all donations will be used to further the educational programs, helping to empower the next generation of shark ambassadors around the world.

We are beyond thrilled to have LandShark partner with us in order to further our mission and help drive the movement to save sharks and our oceans.