The 2018 modern day entrepreneur requires more than a wifi signal. They require a stimulating environment of energy, ideas, and networks.   They require the promotion of well-being and a balanced lifestyle after 12 hour days to refresh and re-energize. With newly recognized needs, entrepreneurs have found themselves congregating in specific hotspots boosting an optimization of life and business combined.

Entrepreneurs have aspired to create business hubs in unexpected places. Blame the cost of running or maintaining a start-up and we are packing our bags for places that don’t exchange happiness for a high cost of living or a low standard of safety. The top three 2018 contenders in order of rankings are Canguu, Budapest and Ho Chi Min City.

Our results are analyzed based off of Nomadlist.com, a crowd-sourced database of cities in the world that best rank on cost of living, wifi strength, fun and safety resulting in an overall “nomad score.” Entrepreneurs themselves log in to the site rating new cities helping others decide where to move next. These factors contribute to a successful entrepreneurial lifestyle

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Once a backpackers dream, digital nomads are swayed by maintaining a good lifestyle on just $440 a month, fast paced city life and tantalizing cheap street food. It’s loud, busy and chaotic keeping up with the energetic levels entrepreneurs often enjoy feeling a part of. Most of its residents are under 30 and keeping up with the world.

It’s important to be somewhere where others understand the idea of being location independent, expanding your networks with like-minded individuals that help you see through on this new dimension of life. Ho Chi Min is seeing A-type personalities who would have otherwise  went to work at Goldman fueling scalable projects and has played host to ex-employees from Apple who have gone on to work on their terms. The key factor here is about optimization and decreasing the time spent on Mundane. For a small fee, your entire apartment is serviced, your morning smoothie is delivered and a motorbike shoots you around the city at a fraction of the cost.  NY only features the mentioned as luxury services where here you’re life becomes free of demands and you’re able to scale at a much rapid pace due to focus.

Come to Ho Chi Min to crank out your product or business in a community where $1,500 affords a privileged life. Forget your day to day mundane and focus your attention on what needs it most.  Surround yourself with a youthful energy where people are friendly yet maintain a fierce work ethic.

Ubud, Bali, Indonesia

Bali’s main motivator is its network of co-working spaces.  Year by year it grows a community of global independent workers, working under the same roof. Top selected spaces are Outpost, featuring two outdoor pools and making bold claims as to featuring “the space Google would build if it were here.”  Then there’s Hubud which ties it’s entrepreneurial force together with nightly events to feed and inspire creative minds. The interior is earthy and bamboo-like, allowing for plenty of air and light to draw ideas from nature’s best.

To provide a better idea of Bali’s popularity and savvy internet skills, its rings up as number 2 for Facebook’s most logged in sessions. As a place heavily dependant on social media and sharing, you can be sure to be side by side amiable, friendly and active entrepreneurs.

Budapest, Hungary

What may be the most surprising city on the list has built up an extremely active ecosystem in the shortest of timespans. Budapest can thank important individuals such as Peter B. Zaboji and his founding European Entrepreneurship Foundation.  He has invested heavily in bringing start-ups together which has spurred the onset of rapid movements. The E.U. Jeremie Fund now puts up 70 percent of a funding round if an investor provides the other 30 percent. The city is also home to countless innovations labs such as X Labs and SparkLab. Who knew one could have the beauty of Europe and a thriving entrepreneurial culture all in one upcoming city.

 

Rachel is a contributing writer at Grit Daily. She specializes in travel advertising at The New York Times. Building partnerships with global tourism boards, she helps spotlight international business, culture, tech, and food. She believes that if your itinerary doesn’t make you slightly uncomfortable, you’re not digging deep enough.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *